Energy Efficient Windows: What you need to know

windows closeup

Double glazed windows offer a myriad of benefits to your home. With a range of styles and finishes available, you can get a great new look for your property, while also enjoying the benefit of increased security and soundproofing. But perhaps the biggest benefit to investing in new windows, is the improved energy efficiency they offer.

Double glazing has long been known for its improved energy performance and with new developments in manufacturing and design, they are more energy efficient than ever before. But how do they work? And what are the benefits for you and your home? Humber windows are here to explain.

Window energy efficiency ratings 

Windows are rated according to a scale developed by the British Fenestration Ratings Council (BFRC).

This provides you with an at-a-glance view of how efficient your windows are. Windows are measured against three core criteria: How well they capture warmth from the sunlight; how much heat is lost through air loss, and how much heat is lost through conduction.

The highest performing windows are rated A++, which are the most energy efficient windows, with the lowest scoring E, representing the least energy efficient.

How do energy efficient windows work? 

Windows and doors are the main areas where heat is lost from your home. Heat escapes in two ways. The first is through conduction.

Simply put, the warm air inside your home and the cool air outside will naturally try to balance out in temperature; the air in your home will lose its heat as it warms the air outside your home. The addition of a second or third layer of glass creates a greater barrier to heat loss, with more material between the warm air inside and cool air outside.

In addition, the heat from your home will warm the air or gas between the two panes of glass before the air outside, effectively trapping it inside your home. Cavities built within the frames work in a similar way, trapping a warm layer of air inside, thereby keeping it in your home. 

The second way heat is lost is through air loss. Gaps between the windowpane and frame are eliminated with air tight seals that prevent heat being lost from your home in this way. 

In addition, Low-Emissivity (Low E) glass is manufactured with a microscopic coating on the inner pane of glass. This allows the sunlight to enter your home while reflecting its heat back into the interior, thereby maximising the amount of heat entering your home. 

New windows are a fantastic addition for your home.

Not only do they look amazing, but they can also create a more comfortable environment in your home while also reducing your energy bills and carbon footprint. If you own a home in the Scunthorpe area and are looking to replace your windows, see how much a new window could cost with our online window quote tool.